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Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low level of blood sugar (glucose), your body’s main energy source.
Treatment of hypoglycemia involves short-term steps to get your blood sugar level back into a normal range and long-term steps by your doctor to identify and treat the underlying subluxations and cause of hypoglycemia.
Your brain needs a steady supply of sugar (glucose), for it neither stores nor manufactures its own energy supply. If glucose levels become too low, as occurs with hypoglycemia, it can have these effects on your brain:

  •   Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks
  • Visual disturbances, such as double vision and blurred vision
  • Hypoglycemia may also cause these other signs and symptoms:
  • Heart palpitation
  • Tremor
  • Anxiety
  • Sweating
  • Hunger

These signs and symptoms aren’t specific to hypoglycemia. There may be other causes. The only way to know for sure that hypoglycemia is the cause is by having your blood sugar level measured at the time of these symptoms. Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar (glucose) level falls too low. There are a number of reasons why this may happen, the most common being a side effect of drugs used for the treatment of diabetes. But to understand how hypoglycemia happens, it helps to know how your body normally regulates blood sugar production, absorption and storage.
Blood sugar regulation
During digestion, your body breaks down carbohydrates from foods — such as bread, rice, pasta, vegetables, fruit and milk products — into various sugar molecules. One of these sugar molecules is glucose, the main energy source for your body. Glucose is absorbed directly into your bloodstream after you eat, but it can’t enter the cells of most of your tissues without the help of insulin — a hormone secreted by your pancreas.
When the level of glucose in your blood rises, it signals certain cells (beta cells) in your pancreas, located behind your stomach, to release insulin. The insulin, in turn, unlocks your cells so that glucose can enter and provide the fuel your cells need to function properly. Any extra glucose is stored in your liver and muscles in the form of glycogen. This process lowers the amount of glucose in your bloodstream and prevents it from reaching dangerously high levels. As your blood sugar level returns to normal, so does the secretion of insulin from your pancreas.
If you haven’t eaten for several hours and your blood sugar level drops, another hormone from your pancreas called glucagon signals your liver to break down the stored glycogen and release glucose back into your bloodstream. This keeps your blood sugar level within a normal range until you eat again.
Aside from your liver breaking down glycogen into glucose, your body also has the ability to manufacture glucose in a process called gluconeogenesis. This process occurs primarily in your liver, but also in your kidneys, and makes use of various substances that are precursors to glucose
Treatment of hypoglycemia involves two basic approaches:

  • Immediate initial treatment to raise your blood sugar level
  • Treatment of the underlying condition that’s causing your hypoglycemia, to prevent it from recurring
  • If you have diabetes, carefully follow the diabetes management plan you and your doctor have developed.
  • If you don’t have diabetes but have recurring episodes of hypoglycemia, eating frequent small meals throughout the day may keep your blood sugar levels from getting too low.

As we all can see if there are subluxations along any level of this process then this condition can become a huge issue in healing. Getting adjusted on a regular basis will normalize function.
So get adjusted!!!
Everything works better with an adjustment.